Terminologies

15

NOTE:
The words in read display more explanations.


The next two weeks will be looking at various terminologies used in the financial sector. You may have heard some of them being mentioned without really understanding it. I guess you will find these useful.

Balance Sheet:

A quantitative summary of a company’s financial condition at a specific point in time, including assets, liabilities and networth. The first part of a balance sheet shows all the productive assets a company owns, and the second part shows all the financing methods (such as liabilities and shareholders’ equity). also called statement of condition.

Accounting:

The systematic recording, reporting, and analysis of financial transactions of a business. Accounting allows a company to analyze the financial performance of the business, and look at statistics such as net profit.

Asset:

Any item of economic value owned by an individual or corporation, especially that which could be converted to cash. Examples are cash, securities, accounts receivable, inventory, office equipment, real estate, a car, and other property.On a balance sheet, assets are equal to the sum of liabilities, common stock, preferred stock, and retained earnings.

Liability:

An obligation that legally binds a company to settle a debt. When one is liable for a debt, they are responsible for paying the debt. A liability is recorded on the balance sheet and can include accounts payable, taxes, wages, accrued expenses, and deferred revenues. Current liabilities are debts payable within one year, while long-term liabilities are debts payable over a longer period.

Shareholders’ Equity:

An ownership interest in a corporation in the form of common stock or preferred stock. It is calculated by taking the total assets minus total liabilities; here also called shareholder’s equity or net worth or book value.

Income Statement:

An accounting of sales, expenses, and net profit for a given period. an income statement depicts what happened over a month, quarter, or year. It is based on a fundamental accounting equation (Income = Revenue – Expenses) and shows the rate at which the owners equity is changing for better or worse.

Revenue:

The total amount of money received by the company for goods sold or services provided during a certain time period. It also includes all net sales, exchange of assets; interest and any other increase in owner’s equity and is calculated before any expenses are subtracted.

Expense:

Any cost of doing business resulting from revenue-generating activities.

Net Income:

Cash Flow Statement:

A summary of the actual or anticipated incomings and outgoings of cash in a firm over an accounting period (month, quarter, year).It answers the questions:

  • Where the money came (will come) from?
  • Where it went (will go)?

Cash flow statements assess the amount, timing, and predictability of cash-inflows and cash-outflows, and are used as the basis for budgeting and business-planning.The accounting data is presented usually in three main sections:

  1. Operating-activities (sales of goods or services),
  2. Investing-activities (sale or purchase of an asset, for example), and
  3. Financing-activities (borrowings, or sale of common stock, for example).

Together, these sections show the overall (net) change in the firm’s cash-flow for the period the statement is prepared.

Accounts Payable:

Money which a company owes to vendors for products and services purchased on credit. This item appears on the company’s balance sheet as a current liability, since the expectation is that the liability will be fulfilled in less than a year. When accounts payable are paid off, it represents a negative cash flow for the company.

Accounts Receivable:

Money which is owed to a company by a customer for products and services provided on credit. This is often treated as a current asset on a balance sheet. A specific sale is generally only treated as an account receivable after the customer is sent an invoice.

EBITDA:
Earnings Before Interest, Taxes, Depreciation and Amortization. An approximate measure of a company’s operating cash flow based on data from the company’s income statement. Calculated by looking at earnings before the deduction of interest expenses, taxes, depreciation, and amortization. The formula is:   EBITDA = Revenue — Expenses (excluding interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization)

Invisible Hand:
Term used by Adam Smith to describe the natural force that guides free market capitalism through competition for scarce resources. According to Adam Smith, in a free market each participant will try to maximize self-interest, and the interaction of market participants, leading to exchange of goods and services, enables each participant to be better of than when simply producing for…

Letter of Credit:

L/C. A binding document that a buyer can request from his bank in order to guarantee that the payment for goods will be transferred to the seller. Basically, a letter of credit gives the seller reassurance that he will receive the payment for the goods. In order for the payment to occur, the seller has to present the bank with the necessary shipping documents confirming the shipment of goods…

Financial Leverage:

The degree to which an investor or business is utilizing borrowed money. Companies that are highly leveraged may be at risk of bankruptcy if they are unable to make payments on their debt; they may also be unable to find new lenders in the future. Financial leverage is not always bad, however; it can increase the shareholders’ return on investment and often there are tax advantages associated…

Dividend:

A taxable payment declared by a company’s board of directors and given to its shareholders out of the company’s current or retained earnings, usually quarterly. Dividends are usually given as cash (cash dividend), but they can also take the form of stock (stock dividend) or other property. Dividends provide an incentive to own stock in stable companies even if they are not experiencing much…

Variable Cost:

A cost of labor, material or overhead that changes according to the change in the volume of production units. Combined with fixed costs, variable costs make up the total cost of production. While the total variable cost changes with increased production, the total fixed costs stays the same.

Consumer:

An individual who buys products or services for personal use and not for manufacture or resale. A consumer is someone who can make the decision whether or not to purchase an item at the store, and someone who can be influenced by marketing and advertisements. Any time someone goes to a store and purchases a toy, shirt, beverage, or anything else, they are making that decision as a consumer.

Service:

A type of economic activity that is intangible, is not stored and does not result in ownership. A service is consumed at the point of sale. Services are one of the two key components of economics, the other being goods. Examples of services include the transfer of goods, such as the postal service delivering mail, and the use of expertise or experience, such as a person visiting a doctor.

Bond:

A debt instrument issued for a period of more than one year with the purpose of raising capital by borrowing. The Federal government, states, cities, corporations, and many other types of institutions sell bonds. Generally, a bond is a promise to repay the principal along with interest (coupons) on a specified date (maturity). Some bonds do not pay interest, but all bonds require a repayment…

Exchange Rate:

Rate at which one currency may be converted into another. The exchange rate is used when simply converting one currency to another (such as for the purposes of travel to another country), or for engaging in speculation or trading in the foreign exchange market. There are a wide variety of factors which influence the exchange rate, such as interest rates, inflation, and the state of politics…

REFERENCES

http://www.investorguide.com/

You might also like More from author

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.